“Anatomy of the Spirit” by Caroline Myss

Encoded within your body, teaches Dr. Myss, is an energy system linking you directly to the world’s great spiritual traditions. Through it you have direct access to the divine energy that seamlessly connects all life. In Anatomy of the Spirit, Dr. Myss offers a stunning picture of the human
body’s hidden energetic structures, while revealing its precise spiritual code and relationship to the sacred energy of creation. Our most revered wisdom traditions, including Judaism, Christianity, and Hinduism, hold in common
essential teachings about seven specific levels of spiritual development, the stages of power in life

These seven great truths also grace the human body as an energetic system, a spiritual compass pointing the way to the divine. By honoring this inborn code, you can learn to see the symbolic blocks within your energy centers and their correlations with your health, relationships, and spiritual development. Richly interwoven with research, examples, and self-diagnostic guidelines, Anatomy of the Spirit will take you to the heart of the spiritual life and beyond.

“As a Man Thinketh” by James Allen

This little book, filled with much wisdom, can be summed up in this one sentence: “All that a man achieves and all that he fails to achieve is the direct result of his own thoughts”.
Overall, this book is about taking responsibility for your lot in life – the good and the bad – as it can all be traced to the thoughts you entertain day in and day out. It also shows how our thoughts directly impact our
character – we are what we think – How true!!!
I would recommend this book to everyone interested in changing some aspect of their life. It is less than 70 pages & can be read in less than an hour, but its effects could last a lifetime.

“Ask and It Is Given” by Esther and Jerry Hicks

I’ll be honest — I don’t know what to think of the claim that Esther Hicks is channelling non-physical entities. I initially resisted buying this book because I am cautious around such claims of supernatural inspiration. But I respect Wayne Dyer and other great thinkers who praised this book, so I decided to give it a try. I’m glad that I did.

This is one of the most powerful books on manifesting your dreams that I’ve ever read. Every paragraph contains deep truths that just feel intuitively right. This book is especially effective in showing how our emotions are the key to understanding whether we are on the road to success or failure in manifesting our desires. The exercises are both fun and deeply practical. I particularly like the exercises
involving the “Magical Creation Box” and “The Prosperity Game.” They make you feel young again — your imagination is activated and everything suddenly feels possible.

I don’t know whether the origin of this book is supernatural, nor do I care. The message is true and the exercises work. Try it for yourself. It will change your life,

Atlas Shrugged” by Ayn Rand

Published in 1957, Atlas Shrugged was Ayn Rand’s greatest
achievement and last work of fiction. In this novel she dramatizes her unique philosophy through an intellectual mystery story that integrates ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, politics, economics Set in a near-future U.S.A. whose economy is collapsing as a result of the mysterious disappearance of leading innovators and industrialists, this novel presents an astounding panorama of human
life-from the productive genius who becomes a worthless playboy…to the great steel industrialist who does not know that he is working for his own destruction…to the philosopher who becomes a pirate…to the woman who runs a transcontinental railroad…to the lowest track worker in her train tunnels. Peopled by larger-than-life heroes and
villains, charged with towering questions of good and evil, Atlas Shrugged is a philosophical revolution told in the form of an action thriller.

“Awaken the Giant Within” by Anthony Robbins

I first saw Tony Robbins on the Joan Rivers show back in 1993. I was very impressed by his charisma and energy, but like many others, felt that Tony Robbins was just a salesman trying to dupe the naive into buying his books and then all of the other products, seminars etc. At work, I ran into a friend who was radiant (unusual for her) and unusually bubbly she told me some of the changes in her life that were taking place and she had begun to read this book:
“Awaken the Giant”. What really impressed me were the changes that started taking place in the days and weeks that followed. She started to lose weight, was participating more in meetings at work, and then got promoted. I was impressed. So I decided that this must work. I went out and bought Awaken the Giant and began to use the techniques such as “the swish pattern” and “scrambling technique”.
Awaken the Giant is a huge book, but I read it in one week. My job performance improved immediately as did my tennis game. I got immediate and dramatic results. This is not just a “feel good book” the techniques really work

“Beyond Survival” by Gerald Coffee

Retired U.S. Navy captain Coffee was a prisoner of war in North Vietnam from 1966 to 1973, most of the time in Hanoi and in a cell by himself. How he endured and what he learned from the experience are the subjects of this inspiring book. By calling on his inner resources, such as his faith in God, his conviction that the United States was right to be in Vietnam, his love for his wife and children, and his respect for his fellow prisoners, he was able to overcome loneliness and the pain of occasional torture. Each chapter is headed by a paragraph of invincible principles that Coffee discovered for himself during his ordeal: “The only real
security we have is the certainty that we’re equipped to handle whatever happens to us”; “Humor is integral to our peace of mind and ability to go beyond survival.”

“Blink” by Malcolm Gladwell

Blink is about the first two seconds of looking–the decisive glance that knows in an instant. Gladwell, the best-selling author of The Tipping Point, campaigns for snap judgments and mind reading with a gift for translating research into splendid storytelling. Building his case with scenes from a marriage, heart attack triage, speed dating, choking on the golf course, selling cars, and military maneuvers, he persuades readers to think small and focus on the meaning of “thin slices” of behavior. The key is to rely on our
“adaptive unconscious”–a 24/7 mental valet–that provides us with instant and sophisticated information to warn of danger, read a stranger, or react to a new idea.

“Building the Bridge As You Walk On It” by Robert E Quinn

Building the Bridge As You Walk On It tells the personal stories of people who have embraced deep change and inspired author Robert Quinn to take his concept one step further and develop a new model of leadership—“the fundamental state of leadership.” The exploration of this transformative state is at the very heart of the book. Quinn shows how anyone can enter the fundamental state of leadership by engaging in the eight practices that center on the theme of ever–increasing integrity—reflective action, authentic engagement, appreciative inquiry, grounded vision, adaptive confidence, detached interdependence, responsible freedom, and tough love. After each chapter, Quinn challenges you to assess yourself with respect to each practice and to formulate a strategy for personal growth.

“Built to Last” by James C Collins and Jerry I Porras

Built To Last was an extremely thought provoking and eye opening read. Built To Last studies some of the most successful (called the leading companies) and the following companies (non-leaders in an industry). The research for this book produced surprising results for the authors (and the reader). The authors found the there were at least twelve commonly held businesses beliefs that their research refuted. In essence these dearly held business beliefs were
myths. These myths included:

It takes a great idea to start a company Few visionary companies started with a great idea. Many companies started without any specific ideas (HP and Sony) and others were outright failures (3M). In fact a great idea may lead to road of not being able to adapt.

Visionary companies require great and charismatic visionary leaders A charismatic leader in not required and, in fact, can be detrimental to a company’s long-term prospects.

I would recommend this book to anyone engaged in developing and running a business at any level. If you want to design, build and run a lasting enterprise this book has some ideas and insights worth exploring. (Martin Shray)

“Clear Leadership” by Gervase Bushe

Expanding on the fresh concepts that made the first edition of “Clear Leadership” such a success a decade ago, Bushe brings up-to-date the tools and techniques needed to build sustaining partnerships and make today’s collaborative organizations work. This fully revised edition now includes 23 skill-building exercises, dozens of personal stories and examples, and completely new chapters that add a sharper focus on ways that the original model of the four selves – the
Aware, Curious, Appreciative, and Descriptive Self – can help anyone cut through the miscommunication, toxic mush dominating the workplace to achieve clarity, full engagement, and sustained collaboration.